Category: I blew a fuse and truck will not crank full version

I blew a fuse and truck will not crank full version

26.10.2020 By Faekasa

Asked by Joeyg87 Nov 14, at AM. I do not understand the question- "turning over" is the same as "cranking"- this terminology comes from the old Archaic Days when cars had a hand crank- do you mean "turn over but not fire"? Jumper cables will destroy a car's electronics even when they are hooked up right- first step- throw them in the trash and NEVER use them again- always have a good battery and say no to those poor souls who do not think it is important to go into the winter with a fresh battery- now, that is a simple truck, and it should be easy to find out why it is not starting- still getting fuel?

I hooked up battery cables wrong on my Toyota pickup blew 80amp main fuse replaced fuse and hooked up cables correct truck will turn over but not start now. Battery died as daughter left the keys in the ignition over night. After I started the car using jumper cables the Engine light has come on. The car starts now but does not accelerate.

Truck Won’t Start: Tips and Tricks to Avoid Calling the Tow Truck

What should I I have a different car. Content submitted by Users is not endorsed by CarGurus, does not express the opinions of CarGurus, and should not be considered reviewed, screened, or approved by CarGurus. Please refer to CarGurus Terms of Use. Content will be removed if CarGurus becomes aware that it violates our policies. Hook battery cables up back words truck will not crank.

Report Follow. Best Answer Mark helpful. Your Answer:. Upload Photo Photo optional. Related Questions. Start a new Toyota question. Sell Your Car Yourself With a simple, secure transaction. Get Started. Search Toyota Questions. Toyota Experts.

Find great deals from top-rated dealers TM Search.You turn the key and you get that sickening feeling in your stomach. Often a simple fix will get you back on the road fast, and you can avoid calling a tow truck. Sorry, but making promises to your truck will not convince it to start.

It wants to see more effort on your part first. When you turn the key and hear the click-click-click sound we all know to well, your battery is dead.

The magnetic field keeps on failing, so the solenoid spring keeps on snapping back. Turn your headlights on and switch them to high beam. Do they shine brightly and stay bright after about 15 seconds?

If yes, leave them on and turn the key again. Sometimes the extra current draw of headlights through a poor battery terminal connection will make the engine start. Try it. You might get lucky. If it does start, make plans to clean those battery terminals soon. If instead the headlights immediately dim when you turn the key it means the battery is dead.

i blew a fuse and truck will not crank full version

Try jump starting it. Wear safety goggles, because batteries can explode and will blow acid and plastic shrapnel at you with great force. Possibly you have a bad solenoid or a bad starter motor. If you can see the starter motor, tap on it firmly, but not with deadly force. Then try turning the key again. If still no luck, you can have somebody hold the key on start while you tap on the starter.

Many times, that will jar a bad starter motor loose and make it start the engine. What to do? When you first turn the key can you hear the electric fuel pump inside the gas tank come on and run for three to five seconds? If not, then listen closely near the fuel filler cap as somebody else turns the key from off to run, but not all the way to start.

Get a rubber mallet and bang sharply on the bottom of the fuel tank as your helper cranks the engine over. Many times, the banging will jar a stuck fuel pump loose and make it run. Obviously, you want to be sure the truck is in park in neutral for a standard transmissionthe parking brake is on, and that your helper has his foot on the brakes.

Locate the fuel pump relay inside the fuse box and replace it with a good one. Where can you find a known good relay at a time like this? Perhaps you might take one from the windshield wipers. You will find several. Check them all, and if you find a bad one, substitute it with a known good fuse from an accessory with the same capacity fuse. Do not insert a fuse with a higher rating. The reason for checking fuses is that the PCM ECM in some trucks powers the fuel pump relay, and that particular circuit within the PCM has a separate fuse that powers it.

This is one of those things that takes less time to do than it takes to explain. It means the problem is not lack of fuel. Suspect lack of spark.

Many things will cause that on a modern truck with fuel injection and electronic ignition, as those two systems share some common data sources like the crankshaft position sensor and a camshaft position sensor. Trouble shooting can be involved, so all a novice can reasonably do is locate all the fuses that power the ECM and check them all. Hope you find a bad one.Discussion in ' 2nd Gen. Tacomas ' started by hoverloverDec 11, Log in or Sign up. Tacoma World. Welcome to Tacoma World! You are currently viewing as a guest!

To get full-access, you need to register for a FREE account. New Alarm - Now the truck doesn't crank. Post Reply.

Hey guys, just had my alarm installed by a professional with lots of experience. Everything was working great untill I came to pick the truck up. Now the truck won't even crank. Checked all fuses, checked all wiring, checked the relays. No luck. Everything seems to work fine, but she's not turning over. Maybe peruse this thread ElBlancoTacoDec 11, Shouldn't the alarm guy fix it? Something similar happened when I installed my viper alarm. I think if you tap into the wrong wire to do the clutch switch bypass you blow a fuse under the hood BassAckwardsgarciavoutxider and 1 other person like this.

Still begs the question as to why it blew. Last edited: Dec 11, Lexus is studs in front to keep stock wheels, general grabber red letters, nfab front bumper. Throw the alarm in the garbage.Gain extra benefits by becoming a Supporting Member Click here find out how! Send Private Topic View Profile. Execution time: 0. All times are GMT Pacific. Current time is AM Top. Attach Photos to Posts. Contact Us. My Cookies. Frequently Asked Questions.

Forum Rules. Now, it's burning fuses. As soon I switch it on, I hear the pop! I need to check the compressor and fan grounds. The compressor probably needs a larger ground wire. I'll definately reroute it to a better ground than the firewall.

I unplugged the compressor. As soon as I moved the switch to the on position, bam, the fuse blew. I have to go buy some more fuses.

I blew up the last one. Next, testing between the switches, resistor and body harness. I did find one exposed wire out of the loom. It was okay. I taped it up and secured it. I'll continue working on it tomorrow. First, I have to replace a factory fan relay harness on my 96 Jimmy. A large wiring harness routed over the power wire wiggled it loose. The harness was rerouted and secured. I didn't notice but my alternator was not charging.

I drove around two days before noticing power loss. I guess the low voltage kept the fuse from blowing. I replaced a failed switch and the alternator is charging to full power. The fuse is blowing again. It does not blow on vent settings. So yes, I suspect the fan starting up is drawing too many amps. I'm going to pull the fan out and check operation. Due to age, it may be worn out. The system ran fine for the two days when the alternator was not charging.

I use a switch with a light to supply 12 volts to the alternator.Search Member List Calendar Help. Login — Register. Threaded Mode Linear Mode. Post: 1. I have GMC Sonoma, 4. If you measure the load side of the fuse to ground after the fuse blows it shows a dead short. The problem still persists. Thinking there was an intermittant short somewhere in the line, I ran new power lines from the fuse block, but it didn't help.

I have also replaced the starter and starter relay to no avail. Post: 2. You may need a proper wiring diagram to figure out what else is on that fuse. Recalling the crank signal also feeds the fuel pump and the bulb check relay. There may be other items not listed in the owner's manual but spelled out in a service manual.

Post: 3. Rupe Wrote: You may need a proper wiring diagram to figure out what else is on that fuse. Thanks for responding, I have a wiring diagram. After the park neutral switch the signal then goes to the coil of the motor starter relay. That's pretty much it. I don't believe the fuel pump is part of that circuit, but I will re-check.

Post: 4. You are correct. The fuel pump itself is not in there but is fed a signal to run the pump during the cranking process. My guess is you need a full diagram from a GM manual instead of the simple versions only showing the parts directly related. Post: 5. I just want to make sure that I know what this fuse all powers.

Also wiggle the wire near the lug and make sure that it is intact. Corrosion can get inside the lug or the insulation near the lug and eat away at the copper, leaving a poor connection that will get very hot under starting current.

English American. SPD20 Junior Member. Posts: 2 Joined: Jan Reputation: 0.Fuses are current overload protection devices, specifically engineered to act as the weak link in an electrical circuit. A fuse keeps a circuit from passing excess current and destroying whatever's attached to it or melting the wires and starting a fire. Automotive ignition fuse malfunctions pose a few unique problems, primarily since they're usually not the only thing on that circuit.

Fuses come in all types and varieties, but they all work in a similar fashion. Current passes through the fuse via a small metal strip or a spring; that small metal strip creates a sort of bottleneck in the system, a point of high impedance where electricity will slow down and turn into heat.

Once that strip gets hot enough, it melts, snaps and breaks the circuit connection.

New Alarm - Now the truck doesn't crank.

So, to find the source of your problem, you'll need to look for an electrical short circuit that pulls more energy through the system than it was designed to handle.

The problem with automotive electrical troubleshooting is that multiple systems often run through the same circuit or fuse.

i blew a fuse and truck will not crank full version

For instance, your ignition system might share its power source with the starter, fuel pump, fuel injectors, ignition control computer or that flashing skull shifter knob you bought from Pep Boys. So, the malfunction might not even be in your ignition system; it could be a malfunction or short circuit in any of the connected systems. The good news is that there aren't too many things in the ignition system itself that can blow your fuse, particularly if the the ignition coil draws its current directly from the battery or alternator via a relay.

If that's the case, then your fault is almost certainly in the ignition switch itself or the wires going to it. Within the distributor itself, a bad or bypassed ballast resistor can repeatedly blow fuses, but that's unlikely unless some hack mechanic did a bad wiring job on it. A bad coil might blow fuses, but it'll more than likely kill the engine before that happens. If your ignition system shares a common circuit with something motorized -- a fuel pump, cooling fans, power window motor, starter, etc.

Electric motors always draw a certain amount of wattage, or amperage multiplied by voltage. Higher voltage makes the motor spin faster, more amperage causes it to produce more torque. If the motor seizes up or something forces it to slow down, voltage draw will drop and amperage draw will increase to maintain the same wattage.

This can easily blow a fuse, particularly if it's already heavily loaded by something as power-hungry as the ignition system. Inspect your wires carefully; hot parts on the engine can easily burn through the wiring's insulation and short the wires, and metal edges will cut through the wires and short them out.

If you've got fuel injection, then you might be experiencing an internal short in the computer itself. In that case, you're out of luck; it's off to the parts store or junkyard for a new computer. This article was written by the It Still Works team, copy edited and fact checked through a multi-point auditing system, in efforts to ensure our readers only receive the best information.

To submit your questions or ideas, or to simply learn more about It Still Works, contact us. Ignition System Faults The good news is that there aren't too many things in the ignition system itself that can blow your fuse, particularly if the the ignition coil draws its current directly from the battery or alternator via a relay.

Ancilliary Faults If your ignition system shares a common circuit with something motorized -- a fuel pump, cooling fans, power window motor, starter, etc. Wiring and Computer Faults Inspect your wires carefully; hot parts on the engine can easily burn through the wiring's insulation and short the wires, and metal edges will cut through the wires and short them out.

About the Author This article was written by the It Still Works team, copy edited and fact checked through a multi-point auditing system, in efforts to ensure our readers only receive the best information.It's easy to get frustrated when you get in your car and the engine won't turn over.

Don't worry quite yet. If you're at home, there are three things you can test that will tell you what's wrong—and you might have an inexpensive repair on your hands. The most likely problem is a dead or drained battery. If that's good, then your battery cables might be dirty or your starter may be going bad. Rule these things out before you spend any time troubleshooting other possibilities.

Many batteries lose their charge or go dead because of an outside power drain. It may have been something as simple as leaving the headlights or a dome light on. Either of these can drain your battery overnight. If you have a battery tester that can measure cranking amps, test your battery to see if it's weak.

i blew a fuse and truck will not crank full version

If the tester shows a weak battery, you'll have to replace it. Drive or run your car for about an hour or so, turn it off, and then restart it.

If it starts, the battery is good. If it doesn't and you need to jumpstart it again, drive it to the nearest automotive store and buy a new battery. Another thing that can stop your car from turning over is a dirty starter cable.

As such, it is also very susceptible to corrosion. If your starter cable becomes corroded, it can be cleaned rather easily. Remove each end of the cables—one end is attached to the battery, and the other is attached to the starter—and clean the connections with a wire brush.

Don't forget to also clean the battery posts at the same time. Unfortunately, the same fate can befall your ground cables. A corroded or poorly connected ground cable can also prevent the car from starting.

Clean ground wires and connections in the same manner. It is also possible that you have a bad starter. A starter can go bad slowly over time and there are some things that can indicate when it is ready to go.

For instance, you may notice that it seems like the engine starts slower than normal in the morning or you may be able to hear the starter turning more slowly than usual when you turn the key. You may also find that one day your car fails to start, then starts perfectly for a few days in a row. Then it fails again. If you checked the three big culprits and they didn't work, keep your cool. There are only a few parts in your starting systemand a little troubleshooting can help you figure out why it's not working.

Sometimes your engine does turn over but will not actually fire. The culprits in this instance can include everything from distributors to coils, fuel pumps to fuel filters, spark plugs to plug wires.